News Archive

  • 09.06.2008
    ESA's comet chaser, Rosetta, last night flew by a small body in the main asteroid belt, asteroid Steins, collecting a wealth of information about this rare type of minor Solar System body.
  • 09.05.2008
    The Rosetta control room at ESA's European Space Operations Centre, ESOC, received the first radio signal after closest approach to asteroid (2867) Steins at 22:14 CEST, confirming a smooth fly-by.
  • 09.05.2008
    This animation is composed of images used for the optical navigation campaign as Rosetta followed (2867) Steins, refining its trajectory to close in on the asteroid. They were taken daily by Navigation Camera A between 25 August and 3 September.
  • 09.04.2008
    Steins is Rosetta's first nominal scientific target. Based upon ground-based observations, it has been classified as an 'E-type' asteroid, composed mainly of silicates and basalts, but its properties are not known in detail.
  • 09.03.2008
    Asteroid (2867) Steins is the first scientific target of ESA's comet chaser Rosetta. Located in the main asteroid belt, lying between the orbit of Mars and Jupiter, this space rock is being intercepted by Rosetta, which is on its way to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Closest approach is scheduled for 5 September 2008, 20:58 CEST.
  • 09.02.2008
    The Rosetta spacecraft control room is buzzing with anticipation as Rosetta closes in on asteroid 2867 Steins. The fly-by timeline includes a series of critical events, culminating with closest approach - expected at 20:58 CEST, 5 September 2008.
  • 08.25.2008
    Heading toward its first target-asteroid, (2867) Steins, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has started using its cameras to visually track the asteroid and eventually determine its orbit with more accuracy.
  • 08.18.2008
    On 14 August, Rosetta conducted a successful trajectory correction manoeuvre using data obtained from ESA's first-ever optical tracking of an asteroid target, (2867) Steins.
  • 08.04.2008
    Heading toward its first target-asteroid, (2867) Steins, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has started using its cameras to visually track the asteroid and eventually determine its orbit with more accuracy.
  • 07.24.2008
    Engineers at ESA's European Space Operations Centre in Germany are working to a tight deadline as ESA's comet-chasing spacecraft Rosetta swings steadily closer to a spectacular asteroid fly-by on 5 September 2008.

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