News Archive

  • 09.15.2016
    ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft is set to complete its incredible mission in a controlled descent to the surface of Comet 67P/C-G on 30 September. Join mission experts on 19 September, 1200 GMT / 1400 CEST to discuss Rosetta’s final days and hours of operation, including expectations for the images and other scientific data that will be collected as the spacecraft gets closer and closer to the surface. We’ll also discuss the exciting discovery of Philae that was made earlier this month.
  • 09.13.2016
    This film showcases some of the Rosetta’s scientific highlights before the orbiter shuts down operations and joins Philae on the surface of the comet on 30 September. This includes findings by the OSIRIS, VIRTIS, ROSINA and ALICE instruments.
  • 09.13.2016
    Members of the media are invited to join Rosetta science and mission control experts at the ESA’s European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, on 29 and 30 September, to follow the conclusion of this historic mission.
  • 09.13.2016
    Frequently asked questions
  • 09.12.2016
    Squeezing out unique scientific observations until the very end, Rosetta’s thrilling mission will culminate with a descent on 30 September towards a region of active pits on the comet’s ‘head’.
  • 09.12.2016
    On 30 September, Rosetta will descend towards a smooth region in Ma’at, on the smaller of the two lobes of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will target a region that is home to several active pits measuring over 100 m wide and over 50 m deep, with the hope to get some close-up glimpses of these fascinating features.
  • 09.08.2016
    Hosted by Euronews Space producer Jeremy Wilks
  • 09.08.2016
    Rosetta’s dust-analysing COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) instrument has made the first unambiguous detection of solid organic matter in the dust particles ejected by Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in the form of complex carbon-bearing molecules. While organics had already been detected in situ on the comet’s surface by instruments on-board Philae and from orbit by Rosetta’s ROSINA , those were both in the form of gases resulting from the sublimation of ices. By contrast, COSIMA has made its detections in solid dust.
  • 09.06.2016
    Join lead scientists for the Rosetta mission* in an educational workshop that explores hands-on activities and resources for engaging students in the science of comets and small bodies. In this workshop for formal and informal educators, US Rosetta project scientist Bonnie Buratti and project manager Art Chmielewski will share some of the basic physics of comets and discuss how the Rosetta mission was able to land on one for the first time. Hear about the mission's latest discoveries, see incredible up-close images of the comet, and get the inside scoop on a second landing on the comet scheduled for Sept. 30, 2016.
  • 09.06.2016
    Less than a month before the end of the mission, Rosetta’s high-resolution camera has revealed the Philae lander wedged into a dark crack on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

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