News Archive

  • 09.29.2016
    Over the past two years, the Rosetta mission has captured the imagination of many people worldwide, stimulating them to produce art and music, and to undertake other creative activities with friends and families – some even made further education or career choices inspired by the mission.
  • 09.29.2016
    The ROSINA instrument on Rosetta has been “sniffing” the environment of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for the past couple of years, obtaining unprecedented measurements of the gases found in a comet's atmosphere. Besides the main component – water vapour – ROSINA detected a wide variety of chemical species, from simple atoms to increasingly complex molecules, including some ingredients that were crucial for the origin of life on Earth.
  • 09.29.2016
    During today's science briefing at ESA's ESOC, Mohamed El-Maarry (University of Bern) presented a series of highlights about the landscape of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Here are some highlights from his presentation.
  • 09.29.2016
    While scientists and the public alike have been astounded by the unexpected shape of Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s nucleus, what lies beneath the surface is just as important scientifically.
  • 09.29.2016
    The Rosetta science highlight briefing at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany.
  • 09.29.2016
    OSIRIS, Rosetta’s Optical, Spectroscopic and Infrared Remote Imaging System, has been our all-seeing eye on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, capturing nearly 68,000 high-resolution images of its nucleus and coma from all angles for 924 days. Here the OSIRIS team share some insights beyond the beauty of the images their camera returns. With inputs from Holger Sierks, OSIRIS principal investigator.
  • 09.29.2016
    How does Rosetta get shut down upon comet landing?
  • 09.29.2016
    RPC, the Rosetta Plasma Consortium, comprises five sensors tasked with investigating the magnetic, electric and plasma environment of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimneko – the most well-known results perhaps being that of the “Singing Comet” and the non-magnetised nature of the comet’s nucleus. Here the team step back in time to the launch of Rosetta in 2004, to deployment of the instrument that enabled these discoveries, and share some of the surprising results collected at the comet over the last two years. With contributions from Christopher Carr, Ingo Richter, Anders Eriksson, Pierre Henri, Hans Nilsson and Ray Goldstein.
  • 09.29.2016
    The European Space Agency Rosetta mission will end dramatically Friday, Sept. 30, by touching down on a region of a comet known for active pits that spew dust into space.
  • 09.29.2016
    As activity for the Rosetta Flight Control Team steadily winds down toward Friday’s end of mission, we’ve been hearing a number of ‘insider tales’ from the engineers, who are already reminiscing about their favourite moments from Rosetta’s epic journey. This was sent in by Armelle Hubault, spacecraft operations engineer responsible for automation, telecommanding and some of the instruments on Rosetta

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